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Players come and go, but the Murrays stay forever

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Players come and go, but the Murrays stay forever

 

Through thick and thin, Andy Murray has never been afraid of opening himself up, or showing a chink in his ironclad (under) armour.

 

In 2006, aged 19, he stunned world No. 1 Roger Federer in Cincinnati for the biggest win of his early career. He then started crying on his chair, holding his head in disbelief.

 

 


 

In 2008, he candidly showed his right bicep to a frenzied Wimbledon Centre Court crowd after mounting a humongous five-set comeback against Richard Gasquet. The shades of night were falling, but it was the stepping-off point of Murray’s rise.

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Point in Time No.6, as requested by @andymurray himself ???????? In 2008, Murray had never been beyond the fourth round at #Wimbledon, and found himself set to fall at the same hurdle against Richard Gasquet, as the Frenchman, leading by two sets to love, served for the match at 5-4 in the third. But Murray claimed his first break of the match just in time and went on to take the third set to a tie-break, which he won with a preposterous backhand pass hit so wide of the tramlines that commentator Andrew Castle suggested it could have been a “hard court shot.” Cue pandemonium on Centre Court, a memorable five set comeback and a permanent place in the Wimbledon crowd’s affections.

Une publication partagée par Wimbledon (@wimbledon) le

 

 

In 2010, he was moved to tears after losing his second Grand Slam final to Federer in Australia. “I can cry like Roger; it’s just a shame I can’t play like him,” he said during the trophy ceremony, with his usual wit and sarcastic humour.

 

In 2012, history repeated itself at Wimbledon. But Murray went back to the drawing board right after, and one month later, at the very same place, against the very same opponent, he became an Olympic singles champion.

 

In 2013, by beating world No. 1 Novak Djokovic in straights, he’d become a Wimbledon champion period — the first Brit to triumph at SW19 in 77 years. It was, undoubtedly, one of the most defining moments in tennis history, and there is little doubt there was not one dry eye in the country that day.

 

 


 

In 2015, he won Great Britain its first Davis Cup in 79 years. As he fell to the clay, caught up in his teammates ecstasy, he was gracious enough to dismiss them and run to the net to shake his opponent David Goffin’s hand. That gesture spoke volumes of the type of person Andy Murray is.

 

 


 

In 2018, we got to spend some time around that wonderful person as he came to our Academy to try and claw his way back to the tour.

 

He stayed for two weeks, but it was enough time to cement his place in here forever.

 

On March 29, Patrick Mouratoglou named the Academy’s Court 3 after Andy Murray.

 

“As you can see, one of our main goals here is to educate kids to make them successful people. For that, there is nothing better than role models, and you are an incredible role model to all the kids,” Patrick said in his opening speech before Murray leaves a handprint at the entrance to the court. "Through your career and what you achieved, you showed you have in yourself all the values of high level and sport. For all these reasons, we’re proud to have you here.”

 

That morning, more than a hundred of our student-athletes gathered to meet Andy Murray and exchange a few balls with him. The three-time Grand Slam champion may have been used to hearing large crowds chanting his name, but he seemed moved by such a warm reception after having spent eight months away from the tour.

 

 


 

Murray did come back to the tour afterwards; but it was no longer the same.

 

Today, in a harrowing, gut-wrenching, heartfelt press conference, the winningest tennis champion in Great Britain history called it quits. Murray announced that he would retire after Wimbledon, if not before if the pain he’s been struggling with for two years becomes simply too much. He said there was a possibility this year's Australian Open could be his last tournament.

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

“I spoke to my team and I told them I can’t keep doing this. I needed to have an end point...” - @andymurray

Une publication partagée par Australian Open (@australianopen) le

 

 

Regardless of when Elvis leaves the building, thank you for all of this, Andy — thank you for never being scared of showing emotion, for always staying true to yourself, for being an outspoken feminist and for inspiring a generation of tennis players.

 

Players come and go, but the Murrays stay forever.

 

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